Performance Art

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I’ll put this out there: I’m not good with kids. If you leave me around with a kid for more than half an hour, that is a minor inconvenience to me. If you leave two kids or more with me, then you either hate your kids or you hate me.

Don’t get me wrong, I love kids. I really do, it’s just that I’m not good at dealing with them in a mature manner. I’d make the worst parent because I don’t have the nerve to say “no” to them or do what has to be done. And speaking of that, teenagers? Don’t even go there with me. If you think I’m bad with little kids you should see me try to deal with a teenager. It’s a joke.

 

But kids are great when they’re supervised by their parents or if they are with a nanny. In that situation, they can be pretty entertaining and I can put up with them. Put that kid in a public situation with people they don’t know and you get double the entertainment. That’s your entertainment for the night.

 

Marina Abramovic once said that performance art was all about context and that the context of what you do is different in a museum than out in the real world. For example, if you bake bread in a museum, it is considered art, but if you do the same exact thing at home, you’re just baking bread. Children have no sense of what “context” really means, which makes them the best performance artists in the world.

 

I was running around the track with the kid of one of my friends when she says to me “My mom told me that you’re different from other people.” “I…uh…hmmm.” “She says it’s okay to be gay. Are you single?” “I….um…….no…uh.”

 

I have another theory. I once read some commentary about what art should mean (I read this in a required reading for one of the classes that I took while in college). The author, who was quite prominent in the art community in San Francisco, said that “good” art should be disruptive; in other words, the goal of “good” art should disrupt people’s perceived idea of what “reality” means to them. I wanted to see if the author had kids because if that was true, then kids would fulfill that purpose to a T.

 

To back this up, I would like to bring up an example. I was celebrating my birthday with a few friends in West Hollywood. I have friends of all ages: those old enough to be my parents to those just entering college. One of my friends brought her two children with her: one son and one daughter: the son was two years old and the daughter was 7 months. If there were ever an embodiment of hyperactive energy and restlessness, it was these two children. In the restaurant that we were in, there were several other large tables with people focused on their own events.

 

 Now, the two-year-old boy decided he wanted to run around all over, and my friend, after half an hour of running after him and trying to get him to settle down, gave up and thought that it would be best to just let him run until he was tired. This situation was already bad enough, but then the 7-month-old little girl decided that this would be an appropriate place to practice these bloodcurdling screams that she was passing off as human conversation. It felt excruciating. My friend tried to have her stop but this kid just wouldn’t stop screaming. When I looked over at the other table I saw the disapproving stare of a teen. I gave her a fake smile and pretended that having a screaming kid at your lunch table was the most normal thing possible. Disruptive indeed.